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Monster

Watch out for these red flags and learn how to reply if you're asked an illegal question. The #CivilRightsAct of l964, “prohibits employment #discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin.” As a job seeker, you want to be able to spot red flags 🚩that could indicate you’re not being treated fairly. These five #interviewquestions are illegal for potential #employers to ask you. 🚩“Do you have any physical or mental disabilities?” 👉Why it’s illegal: The Americans with Disability Act (ADA) says it is unlawful for an employer to discriminate against a qualified applicant or employee with a disability. Private employers with 15 or more employees, as well as state and local government employers, must abide by the ADA. 🚩“When are you planning to have children?” 👉Why it’s illegal: Sex is a federally protected class, which means an employer cannot discriminate against a male or female job applicant. 🚩“Will you need time off for religious holidays?” 👉Why it’s illegal: Religious discrimination is prohibited, so employers are barred from basing hiring decisions on a person’s religious beliefs, observances, or practices. 🚩“What country are you from?” 👉Why it’s illegal: National origin is a federally protected class. Consequently, employers cannot base hiring decisions on whether an applicant is from a different country or of a specific ethnicity. 🚩“How often are you deployed for Army Reserve training?” 👉Why it’s illegal: Because military status is a federally protected class, companies cannot make employment decisions based on a job candidate’s past, current, or future military membership or service.


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Monster monster

Monster

To get a job, you must position yourself as the answer to a proverbial question. This is how to match your experience with an employer’s needs and knock the, 'Why should we hire you?' question out of the park. 🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻 ➡️Focus on the employer’s needs (not yours) Your personal career goals are certainly important, but this question is an opportunity to explain how you’ll bring value to the company. ➡️Reflect on the job itself: You can also learn a lot from a job posting. Most job descriptions outline not only the job responsibilities and qualifications, but also what core skills are required to be successful in the position. ➡️Address cultural fit About eight in 10 employers said they measure for cultural fit when hiring job candidates. Make sure you're it. ➡️Avoid clichés Using trite words or phrases to articulate your value is one of the biggest mistakes job candidates make. You know you’re not going blow hiring managers away with your originality by using lines they’ve heard over and over again, so avoid them at all costs. ➡️Don’t hold back Look at past performance reviews to see what managers praised you for and talk to former co-workers about your contributions—then highlight those skills or achievements. And, lead with a power statement.


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Monster

It's #reviewseason! That means constructive criticism is on the mind of today's job candidate. To bring you tips on how to handle the critics (aka your boss), we brought in the experts. ------- 👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇 Career Expert 1️⃣: @elanalyngross, journalist @Forbes and @columbiajournalism grad "Accepting constructive criticism starts by shifting your perspective to your manager’s point of view, which makes the feedback easier to reckon with. For instance, your opinion may be that you’re missing deadlines because they’re unrealistic and you’re multitasking multiple projects. Your boss’s opinion may be that you’re missing deadlines because you don’t think they are important or because you have lousy time-management skills. The key is to have an honest and respectful conversation and consider each other’s perspectives." ——————————————————Career Expert 2️⃣: @linadarrisaw, founder and #CEO of #NYC–based career-coaching firm @CSuiteCoach and @NYUniversity professor “We take pride in our work, and it is hard not to take professional feedback personally. To deal with this, first try to assume that the feedback is coming from a good place and that your boss wants you to be successful. Even high performers need to constantly sharpen their skills.” ————————————————Career Expert 3️⃣: @leahweissphd: Take a day or two to reflect on the feedback. “It’s hard to do this if you reply right away, so it’s best to take a few moments or longer,” Weiss says. “Take a deep breath and ask yourself the following,” she says. “Did the feedback point out something you didn’t think of? Was it something that you can admit needs work or improvement? Did the person give you actionable steps towards fixing the problem?”"


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Monster

During the course of a #jobinterview, an #interviewer may ask you to tell them the difference between good and exceptional. Prepare your answer to this question ahead of time, use examples from your past work life that exhibit the difference between the two, and have a second example ready.


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Monster

"Tell me about yourself," is an important #jobinterview question that has a way of making candidates blurt out their life stories. But that isn't what potential employers want to hear. They really want to know how your experience is pertinent to the job you're interviewing for. ➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖➖ We recommend you: 1️⃣Focus: Define what you do as it relates to the job, think about three to five past experiences that are relevant to the job at hand and try to quantify in terms of time, money or people. Then list three to five strengths you have that are pertinent to this job (experiences, traits, skills, etc.). All of this adds up to the message you want the interviewer to know about you when you leave. 2️⃣Script: Write out a script that includes the information you want to convey. Begin by talking about past experiences and proven success. 3️⃣Practice: Practice with your script until you feel confident about what you want to emphasize in your statement. Your script should help you stay on track, but you shouldn't memorize it—you don't want to sound like a broadcast news announcer or a robot. You want to sound natural, like a real person that people would like to have in the next cubicle or talk to at the happy hour. 4️⃣Prepare additional answers: It doesn't matter what industry you're in or what stage of your career you're at—the job interview is nerve-racking every single time. The secret to keeping your anxiety at bay is crafting answers in advance.


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Monster

When it comes to the top 100 interview questions, get ready for some brainteasers. 🎾 Why is there fuzz on a tennis ball? ⏰ How many times do a clock's hands overlap in a day? ⚖️ How would you weigh a plane without a scale? 🗺️ If you could get rid of any one of the US states, which one would you get rid of and why?


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Monster

Looking for tips to put candidates at ease? Follow along with out 2020 State of the Candidate report by using the #SOTCandidate hashtag. --------- 1️⃣ Reassure candidates about the company's health and future plans 2️⃣ Up your #employerbranding 3️⃣ Build relationships with passive candidates over time


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Monster

💰72% of candidates feel comfortable negotiating their #salary when accepting a #newjob 💰Younger job seekers are more likely to reject a lowball offer (63% #Millennials / 60% #GenX vs. 52% #Boomers) ---- Follow along on our #SOTCandidate hashtag for more insights from our 2020 State of the Candidate Survey.


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Monster

Ways #recruiters can get creative with salary negotiations: 💰Sign-on bonuses 🏌️‍♀️Stronger benefits and perks 🤞Promise to revisit salary in 6 months instead of a year These tips and more in our @Monster State of the Candidate report. Follow along on our #SOTCandidate hashtag.


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Monster

Salary is still king for getting a new job. When considering a job offer candidates say the most important things are: 💰 #Salary (73%) 😎 Time off/vacation days (39%) ⌚ Flexible work hours (34%) 💸 Retirement benefits (33%) 🙌 Company perks/benefits (33%) ---- Follow along on our #SOTCandidate hashtag for more insights from our 2020 State of the Candidate Survey.


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Monster

People are saying they’re not looking to change jobs in 2020. But if they do make a move, salary has become an even bigger driver in what makes candidates want to seek out a new position. In the 2020 survey, salary was also the top reason for changing jobs, with 30% of survey respondents saying so; but this year, that number has increased to 40%. ---- Follow along on our #SOTCandidate hashtag for more insights from our 2020 State of the Candidate Survey.


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Monster

What do candidates want? 🧐 👉 More money 👉 Job security 👉 Fair and #equalpay 👉 Positive work environments 👉 Diversity and inclusion ---- Follow along on our #SOTCandidate hashtag for more insights from our 2020 State of the Candidate Survey.


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